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. >> a look now at the cost of higher education. heads of universities in inyland, north carolina meet capitol hill to talk about higher education at lower cost. lawmakers are considering changes to the higher education act which is said to expire at year's end. two hours.ut >> today is the second in our series to examine post secondary education. discuss is ofill interest to policymakers -- that is innovation in higher education. we have spent time in this committee discussing the role of innovation, but much of that was focused on college affordability. while that is of paramount importance, we would like to thed this hearing examining landscape of innovations in higher education that increase student learning, engagement, and degree completion. if our nation is going to , we needore students to do more to ensure students are persisting towards and obtaining quality degrees. what can colleges and universities do to maximize learning and support? to ensure students are getting through on time, or faster and earning a meaningful credential. today's panel explores efforts and progress at the in
to education, health care, economic empowerment than just about anywhere except the nordic country in europe. on the other hand, we have so many fewer women in congress, in parliament than other countries and we've certainly never had a female country leader and something like 60 countries to this date have, most of them democratically elected at this point. does your generation kid itself in terms of where america really is, in terms of women's rights. >> still think we lead the world? >> i think that many probably are uneducated on that issue, probably do think that. however, at the same time i know so many young women are very concerned about getting more women in congress, first woman president. everyone knows we haven't had the first woman president yet and other countries have. margaret thatcher they know. this is something that -- that's an issue that young women in my generation are very concerned about. when it comes down to food, water, places to live, things like that i really just say that they have no idea what it's like in some of these other countries is all. >> i would argue
throughout the country. education was the gateway. access to education would provide a better future for the children. today that belief remains the same. education is a pathway for future success. however access to high quality education still remains an illusions to many children. too many african american and other people of color remain segregated in other schools and determined desperate and in later life. a huge gap in problems across the country. add to that the concept of unconscious bias, low expectations and high expulsion and suspension rates and it's so many reasons why they fall below the bar. even in san francisco where we have the highest performing schools we have the highest achievement gap among african american and latino students. we need to invest more in the future of our young people. in 1964, dr. king said, the richest nation on earth has never allocated sufficient schools to allocate teachers. we squander funds on highways, on the pursuit of recreation, on the over abundance of over kill arm meant but we pop rise education. even those these words were 50 year
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
their curious about it they can prototype it and there's a lot of educates out there you don't have to have moifldz dollars so all the tools to make that possible is at the core of what the maker movement is for me. so with respect to our company when i'm talking to the fcc about getting our licenses to communities with satellites in space we're a solid company not like a maker company but internally we're occurring we're full of engineers and scientists that have tools at the their disposal. so i think we would self-identify internally as markers. >> beware i think he's posed to answer this so chris has the title for his next book (laughter). >> the nature come punctuation. >> he has a book and if the employees know what's good for them it's next door. other questions from the audience, please. there's a microphone right there >> so we kind of all noticed how america communes 25 percent of the workforce whatever. i'm curious how you guys think about the maker movement whatever is effecting the way people consume and what's the introductory of how the maker movement is going and a can i
san francisco supreme court the board of education approved by the a vote of 5 yeses and settlement prudent to the district will resend a educational benefit allow the employee to retroactively resign and pay the employee the sum of 5 hundreds as a petition for a writ of men and women democrat and all possible claims against the district will be dropped. in arbitration matters and case and u.s. grievance number case no. ar b12 dash 2 r-7 the board of education approvals a supplement prudent to which the district will make 62 bargaining unit members. cumulative totally $500 plus in exchange for a dismissal claims relatively to the 2012 low implementation. do we have the vote on the last item >> 4 i's one a bit estimation. >> so in the matter of g l vs. the san francisco unified school district case no. 20168 percent 2 the board of education gives the authority of the district to pay up to the stipulated amount. in the united education matters pe rb case the board of education approved by the vote a supplemental prudent to which the district will pay 3 hours of extended hours pay to
a trump card. educational equity is still an unmet promise. bullying of lgbt in schools still needs to be cared for. immigration reform for undocumented workers who are making this country strong. i look forward to working with everyone here tonight to make all of those dreams come true. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> our next awardee is the homeless prenatal program. the homeless prenatal program is honored to present this award on behalf of 500 low income families who have a chance to dream about a better future for their children and determination to make that dream a reality. we accept this award on behalf of it's staff. many of whom are clients through tireless work. we have come a long way from the march on washington and we have a long way left to go. since 1963, a structural injustice remains. the poverty unjustly reflects the poverty and instability of our color. htp is committed to challenging these disparities by providing critical health and social services not only to seek as safety net but also empower families, with affordable housing and education and job train
particularly entrepreneurs. i want to get you to talk about the education and the world of the united states. what kind of impact if the immigration reform didn't happen what impact will it have >> in the short time the visas the h1 petition we're trying to find a replacement for that person in the united states it's difficult to find people with skills so we might enable them to set up their offices and build a team. >> i was going to say if you guys haven't checked out the start up report they've done things around the world. so everywhere the e go system is growing but if we don't fix the immigration issues then the other pavrts parts of the world like brazil and china and venture capita lifts have activity invest in other countries >> if it does happen have you seen the banner - we'll just get real sad. >> mayor lee. i think the recovery will not be fully for everybody. you'll have thirty to 50 thousand people in our city alone maybe 2 and a half million that don't talk about their health and they have to create things underground and that effects health safety and fiscal safety in ou
about college education. >> to start your life 80 grand in the hole with your art history major or mid-eastern studies and not finding work, that's why you have to -- >> for that, he is supposed to be the mad one. that's for starters and sets the record straight live on this very show. return to the great sinkhole, one of my favorite guests. we will begin with the big story. obama care fiasco and the president apologized. everyone is apologizing and while secretary sebelius was apologizing and talking about the disaster, the health care website he was apologizing about was crashing. it was almost comical. the president took aim at republicans for trying to destroy his law. >> health care is complicated and very personal. it's easy to scare folks. and it's no surprise that some of the same folks trying to scare people now are the same folks who have been trying to sink the affordable care act from the beginning. >> joining me now is the chairman of the republican national committee. you guys have gone from being the villains to suddenly the heroes. how on earth did this happen? >> it's
and an improvement in the education system. >> can the government actually come up with bold policies if these vested interests actually come up against opposition? >> well, what is happening in china right now, the leaders in beijing are trying to leverage the state council's recent proposal to try to consolidate and amplify public opinion ahead of the meeting that's supposed to reform. we're pretty skeptical these measures will be adequately addressed in a four-day weekend, but we're convinced china can achieve a consumer-driven economy. we believe policies next week that would address the social security system, to address the family registration system and the land right policies will help china move forward on its economic rebalancing act. >> the third plenary session will begin on saturday next week in beijing. >>> japan's new car sales rose in october for the second straight month. that was due to strong demand for mini vehicles and introduction of new hybrid models. auto industry officials say sales totalled more than 420,000 vehicles last month, up 17% year on year. auto sales had been slowi
and environmental policy, infrastructure, education, figuring out how to cause the median income of the average american to rise again which it has not been doing, to re-institute growth in the economy. he did not say this but others have said it, that the republican party needs an organization like the one that moderate democrats created after the debacles of mcgovernite liberalism, the leadership council. such an organization would develop policies and make a relevantive philosophy to ordinary people around the country and convince them that republicans have ways to make their lives better. and make the republican party the opportunity party again that jack can always wanted it to be and also the party of lincoln. there are lots of reformed republicans around. some of them are in dc and some of them are out in the states. what they need is a gathering place and a trumpet and a rallying center. the kemp foundation has the potential to be that organization. i hope you will find ways to , witht so with your time your ideas, and, yes, with your money. so now, the video. enjoy your salads. if you
of a teenager with a toy gunful getting educational bang for your buck. do the college rankings help when it comes to finding the best college for your budget. san antonio >> another controversial abortion law could head to the supreme court. oklahoma's high court ruled a state law banning chemically induced abortions it unconstitutional. earlier this year the supreme court said it would consider the law but sent it to the lower court for further clar itches. >> community outrage after police shoot a teenager carrying is a toy weapon. hundreds marched through the seats of santa rosa, carrying pictures of andy lopez. he was shot seven times by a deputy, smoking a pellet gun for weapon. >> jackson junior is behind bars, serving 2.5 years at a north carolina prison for spending $750,000 in campaign money on luxury items. he tried to check in on sunday but was turned away because of an administrative snaf u. >> with college costs rising parents and students are trying to find a match for education and the bottom line. kilmeny duchardt looks at whether the popular rankings help or hurt in the
and the right folks we have been educating. so when you look at the numbers and the pop up most americans support this. and they'll see the benefits in their communities. i've repealed many companies and it requires us to come and see the support at the state and national level what's fueling the education don't for the community. we get real focused on the national community but it's at the state and local level. and even smaller towns across the country. so the messages it is from the state and local level first >> let's hear from our young entrepreneurs. your creating jobs and paying taxes when you hear this from people what you do you say >> i've definitely paid hoof taxes. the short answer is yeah, the silicon valley if that were not true. it would be like the - i know i've spent a lot of time with interesting people from all over the world and their successful people and their passionate about being here and their contributing to the economy >> i like to give the example of football. imagine the 49ers and we're going to be playing with another team but what if it is other team ha
on the payroll and it's more an educational opportunity as opposed to you to trying to spin it atkins as a entrepreneurship. there's places to find plays like on a berkley >> who's the biscuit employer of your membership. >> we have a few in the top spots but in terms of companies it's browserers in terms of employee basis we have about 1 hundred and 50 employees and it includes anchor and a company you guys have walked by a million times lee ma electronics owns a huge building on 19th and folsom. they're great because they can do electronic contract manufacturing up to scale here 90 in san francisco. another company we learned about makes private label belts for any belt out of macy's or norton's it's made in a company in united states bay view and trader engineering has a manufacturing capacitate has pretty much you've got belts you never think of food and beverage and beer is food and engineering >> and the biggest employer in san francisco it's not your member i mean, i presume there are tons of mustard here and i think we're a relatively small city we have about 90 percent or
. >>> when he tells glen beck about college education. >> to start your life 150 grand in the hole, 80 grand in the hole with your art history major or polly or mideast earn studies and not find work -- that's why you got a trillion dollars in debt. >> and for that, apparently, he's supposed to be the mad one. anyway, that's just for starters. mike sets the record straight live on this very show and also, the return of the great arsen yol hall. the great man is back wearing one of the coolest hats i think i've ever seen in my entire life. >>> they are eating my grapes. wait, wait, those are my grapes. the big story, the i'm sorry tour for the obama care fiasco. the president apologized and joe biden and sebelius, everyone apologizing but while secretary sebelius was apologizing, she was talking about the rollout disaster, of course, the health care website she was apologizing about was crashing, almost comical. at the same time the president came at the republicans for trying to destroy his law. >> health care is complicated and very personal and easy to scare folks, and it's no surprise tha
to invest and the essential pillars of economic growth like education, workforce readiness, science, research and innovation. i believe there are significant savings that can be achieved in our health care system without compromising the quality of care, and in fact, improving the quality of care. and without slashing benefits that seniors have worked so hard for and earned. former secretary-treasurer he paul o'neill has estimated we can save $1 trillion per year without affecting health care outcomes by in acting smart, targeted health care delivery reforms. the institute of medicine estimated the number could be 750 billion dollars. no matter what the exact figure or proposal, these are impressive savings that would strengthen the nation's health- care system without shifting cost and burdens to seniors and states. these have the added benefit of improving quality, -- quality outcomes within the health-care system. so before we continue to obsessively but benefits on the table, i would hope to begin the dialogue about finding solutions that produce health-care cost savings. i am c
, educating kentuckyions about what the affordable care act is all about. our folks got in early and worked with the vendors on the website, and as you know, we had very few problems with it. and it's cranking out people that are joining up every day at the rate of about a thousand a day. we're now over 32,000 people who have signed up for affordable health care. >> you got on the ground floor. i mean, you wanted to do this, correct? >> i wanted to do this, but it was a two-part decision. you know, number one, is it the right thing to do. well, of course, it is. you know, expanding medicaid is the right thing to do. setting up our own exchange and not having kind of a cookie cutter approach that you would have to have at the federal level was the right thing to do. but particularly on expanding medicaid, i also had to be fiscally responsible. and i had to find out if we could afford to do this. and so i asked outside experts. i brought in some actuarial folks, and they took a good hard look at this and they came back and sat down and said, governor, you can't afford not to do this. >> what
health education labor and pensions committee this week. appeared before the house ways and means committee last week and her hearing before the andte will be this tuesday we will have coverage here on c- span. 's just saw kathleen sibelius testimony. she will be making another appearance on capitol hill, testifying before the senate finance committee on wednesday at 10:00 eastern, also on c- span. presidentialan candidate mitt romney talked about health care law and its implementation under the obama administration on "meet the press." he talked about how the federal law differs from the one he enacted in massachusetts when he was governor and the potential impact he thinks the problems could have on the rest of president obama's term. state should be able through the laboratory of democracy model to put in place the plan that works best for them and if they adopt the massachusetts plan, terrific. if they adopt a different plan, that's fine. recognize that massachusetts teaches some important lessons some states are not going to follow. one lesson is health insurance is more expe
. some of it must have been the result of his jesuit education and his experience as a debater. a friend of his is here who knew him and debated with him and told me that at 16, he was just a wonderful, great man, even though he was just a young man at that time. i never knew, really, exactly why he always knew the right thing to say and do. perhaps it was his honesty and his resolve to keep his word. i do not know. i think back on our almost 45 years together and i think of the long meanings -- meetings that perhaps best displayed his ability to reason with people. 'ability to reason with people. one of them was in the old -- in the late 1960's. he had accepted the challenge of a man whose name i think was virgil. who was opposed to any form of gun control. he claimed thanh was -- tom was for every form of gun control. , agreed to appear at this forum at this local high school. virgil as in the newspapers, "i was able to attract -- i think he also wrote on radio and television -- an audience of about 700 people, tom stood on the stage 45.5 hours and answered all of the allegations with
, but coming up the pga is coming to the bay area. and, two big events to raise money for education. that's all coming up in just a few minutes. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, world. cbs reporter louisa hodge s us the rare fossil, accideny unearthed by a c >>> it's the buzz of the dinosaur world. >> cbs reporter luissa hodge shows us the rare fossil accidentally unearthed by a california timer. >> this fossil of dinosaur nicknamed joe is the most complete skeleton ever found for a plant eating dinosaur. it's also the youngest and smallest of its kinds. but for these elementary students, it left big impression. >> it he -- he told us we were going to be the first to see it. >> what did you think? >> that's awesome. >> a high school student found fossil on an excavation dig in southern utah. >> he spotted a piece of bone, called me over. i ignored it. i thought it was a fragment. but then we later learned it was the tip of a nearly complete dinosaur skeleton. >> it took 1300 hours of work to remove rock from the bone. that's after the channeling process of dig up the skeleton. >> we couldn't just carry it
thing where we spent a great deal of time is our educational system urge -- system. have more students country than any other in our educational system. why do they come here, it is not just the quality of education, but the type of education. i think some of the disadvantages of education globally, so many people are taught facts. this might work very well for i am notcores -- and trying to diminish that at all. i do believe the american style of learning should get more credit in the ability to be thoughtful and critical thinking. as an employer who this year we hired 1100 employees and the year before we hired 1100 overyees, i would tell you 80% of the employees come from u.s. universities. we will continue to have that. as an employer and some of you has offices and 38 countries, the bulk of our employees comes from the united states and we are looking for people who know how to think and think creatively. >> thank you, larry. let shift to bill. from allst retailer over the world -- trying to increase the sourcing you're doing here in the united states. could you give us perspectiv
back to a point where you go through the normal process of moving the bills, the labor education bill, the defense bill, move them all individually. there is not enough time when we talk about the calendar. there is not enough time to move all of the bills individually at this point. host: sarah from dover, pennsylvania. caller: good morning. i would like to change the subject a little bit if i can. i live on medicare. the medicare and food stamps -- i am surviving on $125 a week. if they take food stamps away from me -- the -- [indiscernible] he needs to feeds us first before he feeds anyone else. and also, we have a place to live. our guys come home from the service. they are losing because they have no place to live. i would like to see that to happen, too. thank you. host: there is a story in politico. the headline talks about the farm bill that it gets no respect, referencing rodney dangerfield. why is this an important discussion happening? guest: the last time we had a farm bill, that law expired in 2008. what is it, 2013? it has been five years since we had a new farm bill pas
. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> time now for the trenders, social media, this is where you can find us, facebook, twitter and msnbc.com. leave a comment there. this is where you can find me on the radio, monday through friday, noon to 3:00 on channel 127, sirius xm. ed show social media. here are tonight's top trenders, voted on by you. ♪ god bless america >> the number three trender. big hit. ♪ land that i
and in colorado voters will decide whether to raise state income taxes to boost education funding and also whether to tax recreational marijuana. joining us now to talk about these measures are megan verlee of colorado public radio and enrique cerna of kcts in seattle. welcome to you both. enrique cerna, let's talk about this again et ceteraically modified food initiative. this is about labeling, is that what it is? >> yes, it is. it is initiative 522. it would require the labeling of genetically modified foods on to products. what is interesting about this is that there's a lot of controversy over what is exempt and not exempt. and that's one of the things that the opponents of the initiative point out. and they say that they claim that it's a poorly written initiative. and that some items, some dairy products, some meat products, others would not be, would not apply to this. others would. so they think that this is going to add a lot of confusion. they also are against this because they feel that it is going to cost the consumer more money, whatever labeling that has to be done. would be sent do
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. have hail damage to both their cars. ted ted is trying to get a hold of his insurance agent. maxwell is not. he's on geico.com setting up an appointment with an adjuster. ted is now on hold with his insurance company. maxwell is not and just confirmed a 5:30 time for tuesday. ted, is still waiting. yes! maxwell is out and about... with ted's now ex-girlfriend. wheeeee! whoo! later ted! online claims appointments. just a click away on geico.com. store and essentially they just get sold something. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. before you invest in a mattress, discover the bed clinically proven to improve sleep quality. the sleep number bed. once you experience it, there's no going back. right now our queen mattress sets are just $1299-our lowest price ever! plus special financing until 2015. only at one of our 425 sleep number stores nationwide. sleep number. c
security guard and that has the persona of safety. >> reporter: since 2002 the u.s. department of education under title 9 said institutions receiving federal funds must insure education free of sexual discrimination. many colleges and universities say they were unaware of their legal obligation to also protect students from sexual assaults. >> we absolutely put much more emphasis on preventing plagiarism then rape. that's reality. >> reporter: own annie graduated. in 2012 she and andrea found each other. they began to talk about the issue of rape at the university of north carolina. >> we said north carolina is not a bad place. we said its representation of a larger cultural problem. >> reporter: they began to research title 9, interviewing victims of rape and utilizing social media. in 2013 along with former unc administrator and two others they filed a federal complaint against the university of north carolina at the department of education. >> when you have 18- and 19-year-old men and women who are holding the government accountable for rape, like it just--it's boggles my mind. >> report
their heads. if people are better educated about these issues they will call the people on the carpet and say wait a minute. i think the mission, if i can give you that, would be to step outside your circle, your work circle and bring this issue to the broader public so they can create a change in the culture and the public's response to these issues that will then enable the politicians and legislators to make the reforms to the finances and the court's etc that really need to happen and one way i think is a good way to do that and i'm talking, i'm a journalist, an advocacy journalist, it's usually said with a sneer but i wear the badge proudly, to reach out to reporter's because of course they do have that soapbox to share these stories with. so reach out to reporter's in your local newspapers, crime reporter's, whoever, and just invite them to spend the day with you. invite them to spend a day looking at just a day in your life as a public defender, a day in the life of you as a parole officer, whatever it is. and it's a tradition journalist use a lot with cops. we do a police ride along.
for this era to the well-educated, highly professional other hand i found myself drinking of two or three glasses of wine before, five, six. i caught myself quickly and went to rehab. >> what was that like for you? that realization. it's probably the worst thing i've ever gone through in the sense that i was full of shame, deeply humiliated by my behavior i didn't do any of the above but i did blackout each night before i went to sleep, and it was something i said get a handle on it. i have learned so much to alcohol in my childhood. i knew that i was addicted. and i found myself going for help but it was compounding. what is confounding is. >> host: like as a kid mirror mere month on the wall i am my mother after all. do you think that what you have experienced is pretty common with other women? >> guest: the extreme behavior that i was involved in was in the spectrum and i became addicted. i think the larger group of women are not addictive it's only about two and a half percent depending on the country how many are actually alcoholic could but there are involved in risky behavior that
of education ruled preponderance of the evidence is the right standard. it means that colleges require only a fraction more than 50% belief in guilt. they found him guilty banning him from campus for at least three years. >> i broke down and i was crying. you know, i was just devastated. so we walk out of the door, and i remember i dropped to my knees, and that's when i really lost it just started balling. >> i would not ever want to see my child looking the way that he looked. he alternated between rage and then he would just absolutely collapse down on the floor and just sob and sob and sob. >> they feared he might face even more serious consequences. >> so when i got found guilty at und, all of a sudden in my head the thought is if they found me guilty what is to stop a jury from finding me guilty and sending me to jail for 25 years to life. >> were you worried about the stigma? >> horribly. we didn't tell anybody. not even my family. >> the grand forks police department investigated the complaint. but a detective concluded that she had lied to police and that she had sent caleb a text m
are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >> i'm candy crowley in washington with a check of headlines. new details about the shooting rampage at los angeles international airport. federal authorities say suspected gunman paul ciancia shot tsa officer gerardo hernandez multiple times at pointblank range, went up an escalator and then returned to shoot hernandez again. earlier on cnn's "state of the union," michael mccaul described what police found as a suicide note and said mental illness was a chief reason behind the shooting. the 23-year-old ciancia is currently hospitalized in police custody. he's charged with two felonies including the murder of a federal officer. terminal three at l.a.x. is open today. >>> secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east for meeting with u.s. allies. one of kerry's key missions is to smooth relations with saudi arabia which is upse
$40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. his day of coaching begins with knee pain, when... [ man ] hey, brad, want to trade the all-day relief of two aleve for six tylenol? what's the catch? there's no catch. you want me to give up my two aleve for six tylenol? no. for my knee pain, nothing beats my aleve. ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the power tools introduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] today, cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everyone goes home happy. >>> i don't buy that. all right. across the country -- i don't know why. hey, welcome back. we've been having arguments all during the break. across the country 18 states are sending home so-called fat letters
of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he
budget also invests in our nation's most valuable resource, our kids, by boosting support for education, including an early education initiative. the republican budget in the house resulted in the cut of 20% below sequester levels to that part of the budget that funds education. these choices have real consequences. we also know that the deep, immediate sequester cuts are hurting our economy. the non-partisan congressional budget office tells us to meet our defense and national priorities will result in 800,000 fewer american jobs by this time next year. we all know there are smarter ays to reduce deaf -- to equal deficit reduction. in the house, many have offered to plan a quest sequester with balanced cuts to wasteful spending and cuts to unproductive special interest tax breaks. unfortunately we have been denied an opportunity to vote often that plan. finally, this committee should continue to work to shrink the debt. over the last few years, we have cut the 10-year deficit by over 2.7 trillion, excluding the sequester. three-quarters of those savings come from budget cuts. one quart
in the economy, whether it's infrastructure or education, or training the next generation of workers. that actually does create jobs. why is it a 2% gdp? >> why are republicans standing in the way for the job-creating proposals? >> because they don't work. it's like ceding a lead airplane. >> then you're standing on the other side of chamber of commerce -- >> i'm happy to do that. >> rick, you've worked on campaigns, a lot of campaigns, and we're talking about basically two republican parties here what is your view of people like marco rubio, ted cruz, rand paul. >> there's bob,jindal, tim scott, it seems to me the republican party has all the riches on our side and we're not here talking about joe biden running for president, because that would be boring. we're talking about these great personalities, a plethora of riches -- it will be entertaining. >> people forget that. >> who is the purist we're talking about here that can abolish the welfare state. >> one of those guy that is believes good principles also equals good politics. ted chris in the short run hurt the party, but in th
we do not have. senator kerry was talking earlier about the excellence in u.s. higher education, how that has always helped us, training more and better engineers, but those days are ending. so our natural design advantages are going to be harder to come by going forward. and so we need those things, so we are not starting with a 10% cost disadvantage. >> in asia. what would it mean for caterpillar? >> we have a huge business in asia and growing. that is the single largest opportunity over the next decade or so. we intend to lead market. but again, i come back to the point that it is likely that a lot of those countries, a number of those, will do agreements with or without us. if we don't get tpp done. we will look into a market that we ought to be competing with. i'll move to africa because i am passionate about this. we watched the chinese really take over africa. they've come in with their own financing, their own engineering, sometimes their own workers to take over minerals, extraction, oil and gas, hydroelectric power across africa. i know, michael, that is on your agenda. but
a fat letter home? that's ridiculous. >> if you're going to be sending educational material you send it to all the parents of all the kid. >> of course. >> there may be thin kids who never eat a vegetable. he's admitted in the past. >> i'm not a big vegetable eater. i'm working on them. i drink them now. >> in vodka. >> the broader question is whether or not we have to look at what we're doing educationally in terms of whether or not all kids get what i used to get, which is at least one hour of physical education every single day. now they're racheting it. >> now schools are cancelling it. >> cancelling recesses in some cases. then the kids come home and they're on the x-box or whatever until they do their homework. so i was trying to add this up on the way to the studio. i was thinking we were probably playing three or four hours a day. you'd have an hour of physical education, 30 minutes of recess, right after school we went out and played again until our parents made us come home and do homework. this idea that our kids today are just not getting -- they're getting shortchanged.
will be able to come. ine education system afghanistan, not just higher education. universities, the number that was given to me is so i don'ttuitive use it. in terms of the lower grades before you get to colleges and universities, before the taliban was driven out to the been, 900,000ave boys in afghan schools ten or so.ago now 8 million students in schools. about 3 million of those are girls. none of whom could have been educated before we got there allies.r in 2001, under the taliban were 20,000 teachers, all male. now 200,000 teachers. 60,000 of whom are women. healthcare many improved. significantlyty down. refugeeslion afghan who fled to pakistan have returned home. that 67% of the a mostan people in recent survey think that the afghan war was not worth fighting? how did that happen? the picture is much, number.tter than that i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. that the press has story. a good it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. our peoplesion that either.sn't come from it comes from what
rationale in many quarters, particularly higher education. the diversity rationale says we want to engage in special efforts to bring in people from all walks of life, all sectors, all regions, all ideological dispositions, all races. the reason why we want this is we believe that on our campuses there will be richer learning. there will be more learning, better learning, deeper learning takes place through the clash of perspective. and, you know, students will learn from one another. so the diversity rationale for affirmative action. that's some of the why affirmative action rose in the late '60s, early '70s but in these are some of the reasons that have been set for for affirmative action. okay. why is a controversial? affirmative action like all policies has cost. it has costs. what are some of those costs? there's a bunch just like there's a wide range of justifications, rationale, for affirmative action. there's also an array of costs. i'll mention a couple. let me start off with one, stigma. it's an important one because there some people, i think he neatly of the most vociferous cr
constructive on the united states and where we spend a great deal of time is our educational system, which unfortunately a lot of people malign that today. this will be discussed later, but we actually have more students overseas than any other country in our educational system. what you come here? it is not just the quality of education, but the type of education. some of the disadvantages of education globally, so many people are taught rote or talk facts. this may work very well or testing scores, and i'm not trying to diminish that at all. but i do believe that the advantage of the american style of learning, which should get more credit, is the ability to be thoughtful and critical thinking. as an employer who hired 1100 employees this year, i will tell you over 80% of our employees come from u.s. universities. we will continue to have that position. as an employer who has offices in 38 countries, the bulk of our employees come from the united states universities, and what we are looking for, people who know how to think and think creatively. >> thank you, larry. let's shift to bill.
have famously said after the last shutdown there's no education the in the second kick of a mule. so i have to ask you about the second kick of a mule. what happens when we come back to this argument about debt limits again next year and back to this argument about continuing resolutions for the budget? is there a third kick of a mule in the offing here? >> no, we're not going to shut the government down. we're certainly not going to default. but it's an important time to talk about the $1 trillion debt we've run up. about -- looking at it another way, we've accumulated more debt during the obama years than all the presidents from george washington to george bush. this is an alarming statistic. further evidence of what we're leaving behind for the youngest generation. so when you do something like raise the debt ceiling it's not been uncommon going back to the 12950s for there to be significant reforms attached to it. frequent they happens with a continuing resolution. we think it's alarming that america now has a debt that makes us look like a western european country and we think we
on the problems we have in the country right now, rebuilding the middle class, reform our education system, making sure that our health reform system works, and works well. these are the most important things to be focusing on right now, not the 2016 campaign. >> well, you are chairman of health education, labor and pensions committee and will hold the first senate hearing on obama care tomorrow. the thing we keep hearing over and over again, we heard it on the sunday shows and heard it this morning is why did the president say if you like your health care plan, you can keep it. the associated press is reporting three and a half million people have gotten cancellation notices. what do you make of all this, senator? >> what i mean of all of this is we're missing the big picture. yes, we had problems with the rollout, that's inexcusable, but they're being fixed. but let's keep the big picture in mind. we have millions of children today, up to 17 million children with pre-existing conditions who are covered for the first time ever. we have seniors getting free preventive services, never got it before
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